A*STAR IMCB seminar: Using Single-Neuron Neurophysiology in Monkeys to Study Cognition and Develop Brain-Machine Interfaces. A/Prof. Camilo Libedinsky

Using Single-Neuron Neurophysiology in Monkeys to Study Cognition and Develop Brain-Machine Interfaces

Speaker: A/Prof. Camilo Libedinsky, Department of Psychology & Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology, NUS

Date: 12 February 2015, Thursday
Time: 11:00AM – 12:00PM
Venue: Level 3, IMCB Seminar Room 3-46, Proteos, Biopolis

image001The physical mechanisms that underlie the relationship between brain and mind remain largely unknown. My line of research attempts to address this question by analyzing the activity of multiple single-neurons in the brains of non-human primates while they perform complex behavioral tasks. This technique allows high spatial and temporal resolution of neuronal activity. My work involves two lines of research employing the non-human primate model, with the broad objectives of: (1) understanding the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive processes, such as visual perception, working memory and attention; and (2) developing neurotechnologies, such as brain-machine interfaces to aid in the rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord or peripheral nerve injuries. In the first part of the talk I will discuss data from an ongoing experiment where I am studying information processing across prefrontal cortical regions during a visual working memory and distractor suppression task. In the second part of the talk I will describe the development of a brain-machine interface system where the activity of motor cortical signals were used by monkeys to control the movement of a robotic wheelchair.

Biography
Camilo Libedinsky is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at NUS, and has a joint appointment in the Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology, SiNAPSE. He specializes in awake-behaving non-human primate single-cell neurophysiology. He received his PhD in Neurosciences from Harvard Medical School under the supervision of Margaret Livingstone, then did a postdoc in the laboratory of Michael Chee at Duke-NUS followed by a second postdoc at the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR.

More: www.imcb.a-star.edu.sg/php/seminars.php

A*Star IMCB seminar: Elucidation of T cell fate control by time lapse imaging and quantitative microscopy. Dr Sarah Russell

Elucidation of T cell fate control by time lapse imaging and quantitative microscopy

by  Dr. Sarah Russell, Group Leader, Immune Signalling Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Date: 5 February 2015, Thursday
Time: 11:00AM – 12:00PM
Venue: Level 3, IMCB Seminar Room 3-46, Proteos, Biopolis

image001Until recently, studies of immune cell fate determination have utilized population-based approaches, making the behavior of minority and/or transient cell types difficult to capture. Using a number of trasndisciplinary approaches including microfabrication of structures for cell containment, functionalized surfaces to mimic cell-cell interactions, and customized software for image analysis, we have recently developed new methods to quantify behavior of single cells using high throughput fluorescence time lapse microscopy, We have used these approaches to determine how fate is controlled during T cell development and during the acquisition of memory and effector attributes in CD8+ T cells. We have shown that thymocytes undergo asymmetric cell division during T cell development, and have begun to determine using time lapse microscopy how asymmetric cell division influences cell fate decisions. To assess fate determination in response to activation, we derived 10-generation pedigrees of individual naïve CD8+ cells responding to antigen presentation in vitro. We have used these pedigrees to elucidate novel parameters controlling proliferation, apoptosis and effector/memory differentiation.  . These findings provide novel insight into the relative role of intrinsic, extrinsic and stochastic factors in regulating T cell development and CD8 T cell fate.

Biography

Sarah Russell obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne in 1992, where she was involved in the cloning and molecular characterisation of human CD46, a cell surface molecule involved in immune regulation.  From these studies she became interested in signal transduction in the immune system, and moved to the National Institutes of Health, USA, to train in this area.  Under the supervision of Dr Warren Leonard, Sarah was involved in a number of discoveries related to cytokine signalling: demonstrating that the Interleukin 2 Receptor γ chain signals from multiple cytokines (coining the name common γ chain, γc), and demonstrating that the kinase, Jak3 mediates these signals and is mutated in some cases of Severe Combined Deficiency.

Sarah moved back to Australia in 1999 to investigate the role of intracellular compartmentalisation in immune cell fate decisions, obtained a Wellcome Senior Research Fellowship for this work in 1999, and moved to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in 2000.  This work has required substantial development in imaging technologies, and to facilitate this Sarah started a second lab in the Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences at Swinburne University, and has been recently supported by an ARC Future Fellowship and NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship. Her recently work involves uses time lapse fluorescence microscopy and super-resolution microscopy to determine how the immunological synapse and asymmetric cell division determine T cell development and leukemia, and dictate immune responses.

More: www.imcb.a-star.edu.sg/php/seminars.php